The Weblog

This weblog contains LocallyGrown.net news and the weblog entries from all the markets currently using the system.

To visit the authoring market’s website, click on the market name located in the entry’s title.



 
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Northeast Georgia Locally Grown:  Locally Grown - Availability for Novemer 28th, 2012


Hey Local Food Lovers,

I hope everyone had a marvelous Thanksgiving! We were able to take a special trip to Charleston, SC for the holiday and attend their Saturday farmers market. What a fantastic event! There were hundreds of people there, probably a dozen or more farms, another 10 food, coffee and juice vendors, and then 20 or more other arts or processed foods booths. There was a stage with music, and people had dogs (and even cats) on leashes roaming the park. It was a glorious day and I couldn’t help but wish we had a similarly grand market here. Then I remembered…. our farmers markets in the mountains are awesome and getting more awesome all the time!

Just a few weeks ago Simply Homegrown had a Doggie Dress Up day in celebration of Halloween. Here at Locally Grown we are similarly working to make market days more fun and exciting. Just last week every market customer got to taste the latest fruit to bloom on the land, the wondrous Asian Persimmon. I was amazed how quickly folks took to them, and we sold every last one, even though we’d only intended to have folks take one home.

This week is an even bigger treat. At the Clarkesville Pick-Up location, on an every other week schedule we’ll have a FEATURED FARMER actually working the market. They’ll be gathering your items for you like we always do, and I’m sure have time to tell you a bit about what’s going on at the farm as well. We’re really looking forward to having their help over the winter. I think this week will start with Brooks Franklin from Leah Lake Farms. If you’ve eaten lettuce or other greens from Locally Grown this year you’ve very likely eaten Brook’s products. This week alone he has 48 products listed. WOW! Seriously 48 products. That’s almost 30% of all the products listed this week. So we encourage you to come to market this week and MEET YOUR FARMER. I know he’s excited about meeting his customers as well and may ask you some questions too.

I also wanted to mention this week that we’re excited to have a returning farm. Productive Organics is an aquaponic farm in Hall County. They define aquaponic farming as “the merger of fish and vegetables, we feed the fish the fish feed the plants through nitrates that nourish plants, the plants cleans the water for the fish and the cycle start all over.” They are listing buttercrunch lettuces this week from their aquaponic greenhouses. We’re excited to see this new style of farming coming together and hope you may enjoy some as well.

We’d like to hear your ideas as well. Our farms will be getting together in just over a week to brainstorm for next year. We’ll be wanting your feedback sometime after that on everything from crops you’d like to see more of, to other market related improvements we could make. We’ll be asking you fill out a short survey at some point soon, but don’t hesitate to share your ideas while they are fresh. Because Fresh is Best!

We hope you enjoy your fresh veggies this week and …

EAT WELL,

Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun

Atlanta Locally Grown:  Available for Saturday December 1


Wow, this year is just flying by. We are at the end of November already. I hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving. We sure did. The turkey was outstanding. I think I outdid myself in raising such a tasty bird. We will do it again next season so look out for you chance to reserve a treat. Neil and I were talking and have decided to list the whole dinner, from bird to all the fixings.

Despite the cold our gardens are going strong. We have lots of things listed this week. Loads of mushrooms, honey, pork. And a lond list of veggies; Arugula, Asian Greens, Beets, Braising Greens, Broccoli, Broccoli Raab, Cabbage, Carrots, Collard Greens, Endive, Jerusalem Artichokes, Kale,
Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Misc. Greens,
Mustard, Onions, Peppers, Radicchio,
Radishes, Salad Mixes, Spinach, Fennel,
Escarole, Swiss Chard, Sweet Potatoes,
Turnips, Frozen and canned Tomatoes and more.
We will also head up for milk this week!

Remember you have at least 21 meals to plan for this week, 28+ if you include your snacks. We hope some of your selections come from our efforts. We enjoy being your farmers.

Thank you for all your support. Please remember to have your orders placed by 8PM on Wednesday. Pick ups are on Saturday from 9 to 10 at the Piedmont Green Market (Double B Farm booth), Sandy Springs Green Market (Taylorganic booth) and at the Brookhaven Farmers Market(We will be here from 9-10 for pick ups only).

Thank you,
Brady Bala
Market Manager

Monroe Farm Market:  MFM will open on Monday


Dear Monroe Farm Market Friends and Customers,
 
Due to our own technical difficulties, we will not be able to open ordering tonight for Monroe Farm Market.
 
We are planning on opening the market on MONDAY, 11/26 at NOON.
 
We are very sorry for the inconvenience, and thank you for your patience. 

Monroe Farm Market
Union, West Virginia

Conyers Locally Grown:  Available for Friday November 30


Wow, this year is just flying by. We are at the end of November already. I hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving. We sure did. The turkey was outstanding. I think I outdid myself in raising such a tasty bird. We will do it again next season so look out for you chance to reserve a treat. Neil and I were talking and have decided to list the whole dinner, from bird to all the fixings.

Despite the cold our gardens are going strong. We have lots of things listed this week. Loads of mushrooms, honey, pork. And a lond list of veggies; Arugula, Asian Greens, Beets, Braising Greens, Broccoli, Broccoli Raab, Cabbage, Carrots, Collard Greens, Endive, Jerusalem Artichokes, Kale,
Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Misc. Greens,
Mustard, Onions, Peppers, Radicchio,
Radishes, Salad Mixes, Spinach, Fennel,
Escarole, Swiss Chard, Sweet Potatoes,
Turnips, Frozen and canned Tomatoes and more.
We will also head up for milk this week!

Remember you have at least 21 meals to plan for this week, 28+ if you include your snacks. We hope some of your selections come from our efforts. We enjoy being your farmers.

Thank you for all your support. Please remember to have your orders placed by 8PM on Tuesday. We will see you on Friday between 5PM and 7PM at Copy Central (1264 Parker Road, Conyers) and don’t forget to share us with a friend.

Thank you,
Brady Bala
Market Manager

Champaign, OH:  Turkey, turkey and more turkey...


Good evening friends! If you are like me, we have already left-over the leftovers for homemade pizza tonight as we have had our fill. That being said, we start anew with the home stretch towards Christmas this week with your old friends. I promise we will let you enjoy each week but will highlight all the great items for fresh eating and gift-giving. We are thankful for your friendship and committment to shopping local. Please consider us as we ask you extend Small Business Saturday thru this week. Shop away and thank you for shopping with us!

Cedar Grove Farm:  Cedar Grove Farm CSA availability for November 28


Dear Friends and Neighbors,

Here I sit tonight just about to fall into a deep slumber. The Paynes and friends finally had our Thanksgiving dinner. My sister, Lindsey, organized the Thanksgiving dinner at the Emmanuel Episcopal Church on Thursday – over 500 meals served – and then had to cook for some paying customers, too. So, we waited patiently for tonight, and it was absolutely worth it. Where do I begin? Turkey, of course, brined to perfection and roasted in the oven, sweet potato casserole, mashed potatoes, roasted cauliflower with Gruyere cheese, cream, mustard and bread crumbs, sauteed spinach and chard, Marlene’s famous green beans with a reduced balsamic, butter, crispy fried shallots and bacon bits, cornbread dressing, homemade cranberry compote, gravy with giblets and fresh baked dinner rolls. Then we had to have four different pies – pecan, pumpkin, apple and yum yum (mother-in-law Helen’s specialty) topped with real whipped cream. To wash it all down there were two bottles of Pinot Noir – one French and one Californian and – wait for it – a 1996 Chateau Marguex Bordeaux. Best of all, though, was the three generations and several friends who joined us. I hope all of you had as much to be thankful for. We truly are blessed.

Before we go to the available produce for the week, I wanted to update y’all on the Cedar Grove Farm CSA. This is the last week of the Fall Season. As I mentioned before we will continue on a week by week basis. The weekly operation will be managed by our star farmer, Sara Callaway. She will be sending a message shortly describing how we will run the ordering and pickups through the Winter season. The 2013 Spring Season CSA will be much like this year only bigger and better. I am sending a Cedar Grove Farm business card with your order this week so that you will have our contact information for your convenience and to share with your friends. Lots of plans are already underway for next year’s gardens.

The farm is blessing us, too. Cauliflower is done for the Fall. Beets, Shunkyo radish and spinach are back as well as Winterbor kale. Everything else from last week – lots of salad mix, carrots and other good eats – are there for your choosing. I hope you find something to your liking.

The market is open.

Regards, Farmer Jay

Madison GA:  The market is open!!


Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving and I’ll see everyone Wed.

Madison GA:  Hello the market is open!!


Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving! I’ll see everyone Wed.

Swainsboro, GA:  MARKET IS OPEN


Hope everyone had a good Thanksgiving. THE MARKET PICKUP WILL MOVE TO THURSDAY 4-5. Please take a moment to look at what the farmers have to offer this week. See you THURSDAY!!!!!!

Conway, AR:  Opening Bell


Greetings Conway Locally Grown Community,

Hope you had a wonderful thanksgiving! Our nation’s ailing food system was the subject of discussion at my house, and I wanted to share these thoughts with you.

Many critics of local food, organic food, or small-scale agriculture point out that this kind of food is pricy and elitist. Perhaps some of you have come across items offered through Conway Locally Grown that you felt were too expensive, or at least more expensive than the groceries at conventional food markets. I would like to offer an argument to you that justifies paying a little more for your food, and the argument requires understanding the difference between price and cost. Conventional, industrial foods may be offered at a lower price, but that is only because the true costs of the production and consumption of industrial food are not reflected in the price you pay at the register.

Consider the fact that Americans have been spending a smaller and smaller percentage of their income on food each decade since the industrial agricultural revolution of the mid 20th century. Now consider also the reverse trend in the increasing rates of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and other diet related illnesses. Does it make sense for us to be saving money producing and consuming lesser quality foods, only to turn around and spend that money on our increasing health care costs? Of course correlation does not imply causation, and there are many factors that contribute to our declining health as a nation, but poor diet is surely among the culprits.

In addition to health costs, environmental and social costs are also left out of the price of industrial foods. Industrial agriculture uses chemically and mechanically intensified production methods that erode our soils and poison our waterways. The centralized organization of corporate agriculture also tends to concentrate wealth and prevent the growth of local and rural economies. If one were to account for all the costs of food production and consumption, one quickly realizes that there is no such thing as cheap food. I’m not suggesting that the more you spend on your food, the healthier you’ll be. Many foods are expensive simply because of the difficult nature of their production. I am suggesting, however, that you think of the food you are eating as an investment in your personal health, the health of your family, the health of the environment, and the health of society. Isn’t avoiding the costs of losing these things worth paying a slightly higher price for good food?

The market is now open. Remember to hit the checkout button when you’re finished, and you will receive a confirmation email when your order is placed. Thank you for investing in the health of your community.

Have a great day,

Gabe Levin