The Weblog

This weblog contains LocallyGrown.net news and the weblog entries from all the markets currently using the system.

To visit the authoring market’s website, click on the market name located in the entry’s title.



 
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StPete.LocallyGrown.Net:  Market NOW Open - Jan. 28, 2013


Featured Garden: The Faith House, St. Petersburg, Fl

Message from Market Manager

Our first potluck social of the year on Saturday night was very well attended. Thanks to our Growers, Volunteers and Customers who attended. The buffet fair was plentiful and delicious! SPECIAL THANKS to Clark & Peggy Tibbits who so graciously shared their experiences around the fire after dinner. Intentional Communities never looked so good and many people were inspired by the lifestyle with which the Tibbits have been blessed. These monthly socials are held exclusively for actively participating growers, volunteers and customers. Customers who have purchased from our Market within the last four months will receive an Evite to attend the next event. Become part of this circle so you don’t miss out. “St. Pete Locally Grown does alot more than sell tomatoes. We build community!”

MARKET CLOSES WEDNESDAY 12 NOON; DEADLINE FOR ORDERING FROM GERALDSON COMMUNITY FARM (GCF) IS TUESDAY 6PM

BE SURE TO VISIT OUR NEWECONOMY SIZECATEGORY

REQUEST FOR TESTIMONIALS
If you’ve purchased a product on our Market that you really want to recommend to others, we would appreciate any feedback or recommendation that you wish to email us. We will plan to post some of them within the product descriptions to assist others in making their selection. With the cold & flu season well underway, along with aches and pains that can accompany them, we are particularly asking for feedback on the remedies you have been purchasing from either HerbalWise or Imperial Gardens. Both these ladies are working overtime to help us fight off and recover from the “bugs” that track us down and occasionally catch us. Thank you to both Deserie Valloreo of HerbalWise and Jennifer Gilman of Imperial Gardens for your investments in our health.

DON’T FORGET YOUR SWEETIE ON VALENTINE’S DAY!
Buy a gift for the Sweethearts in your life AND support LOCAL small businesses.
Check our Q&A page for unique gift suggestions, including Flour-less Organic Chocolate Gluten Free Cake by GateauOChocolat.

WE BRING THE GARDEN TO YOU!
Winter garden photos from Nathan’s Natural Veggies in St Petersburg. Just in case you haven’t seen these yet…

WELCOME TO OUR NEWEST CUSTOMERS! Once you have submitted your order, if in doubt about what you owe, you can always confirm what you have been charged for by checking your account history and viewing your most current invoice. Instructions on how to do that are on our Q&A page under the question entitled Since you don’t provide an invoice with delivery, how do I know what I owe? . Also, since your vegetables are picked fresh within 24 hours of delivery, they should be lasting for WEEKS in your refrigerator. When you accept delivery, please take a few minutes to inspect your order to protect your vegetables from unnecessary spoilage. Lastly, it is imperative that you understand our policy on Unclaimed Orders found on our Q&A page. When you make a purchase you are agreeing to abide by this policy.

Ready to Order?

Click here to sign in & shop now

  • If you do not receive an email confirmation immediately after you order, then you did not click the SUBMIT ORDER button and we did not receive an order from you.

Get to Know Us

Upcoming Events

All these and more are posted on our Calendar of Events

SUCCESSFUL URBAN FARMING IN ST. PETERSBURG” on Feb. 9th, 1 PM Details are on Calendar of Events. This will be held every Second Saturday of the month and is open to the public. We will be asking for RSVPS to determine whether or not to hold each monthly class. Bring your friends and save $10 each on this valuable experience! You can now pre-purchase this workshop on our Market. This class makes a great gift for any occasion! RSVPs now being accepted.

HOPE TO SEE YOU ON FEB. 23RD at 6PM
Sponsored by St. Pete Locally Grown, potluck socials are held on the 4th Saturday of each month. These events are held exclusively for actively participating Market customers, growers, and volunteers and are meant to create a social atmosphere in which to network, share resources and experiences. Each event will include a brief informational lecture on subjects relevant to our group, including community building, growing and preparing food, health practices, to name a few. Presenters for the February potluck have yet to be announced. An invitation to attend will be sent via Evite and RSVPs to qualitying members.

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Fisher's Produce:  CSA post script


For CSA memberships, make checks payable to:

Fishers Produce
29323 S. 257th W. Ave
Bristow, OK 74010

Thanks!

Fisher's Produce:  CSA Registration is open


Hello Friends,

Spring is on the way! It may be January on the calendar, but there is a balmy South wind blowing. We have been planting seeds in the backyard greenhouse and the first tomato and cabbage plants are up.

Registration is now open for our 2013 CSA season!

We will be doing a “market stand” style CSA this year, the same as last year. There will be 15 weekly deliveries, every Thursday, April 4 through July 11 with an exception for Independence day with delivery on Wednesday, July 3 instead of the 4th.

Delivery Location: Tractor Supply Parking Lot

Time: Thursday evenings, 5:00-6:00pm

Cost: $250.00

Early Bird Discount of 240.00 for those who pay in full by the end of February!

To Sign Up: Be registered on our locallygrown online market and “purchase” the 2013 CSA membership through the online market. (note: the listed price on the market is 0.00. This is for market accounting reasons. CSA membership is not free :)

Payment: Payment by check is preferred though cash and credit card payment options are available. To reserve a spot, we request a $50.00 downpayment by end of February. The remaining balance can be payed in full on the first day of delivery (April 4) or in two payments of $100.00 on April 4 and May 23.

For more CSA information see our website: www.fishersproduce.com/csa.html

For those of you who missed meeting my lovely fiance last summer. We are now married! We took a fall mission trip/honey moon for several months to Africa (particularly, Democratic Republic of the Congo).

We have been back home in Oklahoma since January 1, working on our new little house and getting things ready for the spring growing season. You can see pictures and read updates from our travels on our personal website: www.lukeandchantee.com

We are looking forward to seeing you all. We would also love to have a few more Bristow CSA members. Tell your friends!

~Luke and Chantée

South Cumberland Food Hub:  Time to Order Local Food!


Good Morning Everyone!
It’s time to order local food from your local food hub. We have some beautiful hydroponic lettuce and lettuce mixes available this week from Grundy Greens. Have a great day!

Risa

Cedar Grove Farm:  CSA Availability for January 31


Hey Folks!
Well, we had a taste of the winter cold last week and now we’re back into the warm and cloudy times. January is drawing to a close and I wonder what February will have to offer us in terms of weather this year . . .

Vegetable-wise, we’ve got some gorgeous Easter egg radishes new to the market this week. Tender and crunchy, so beautiful I just want to look at them. These little gems are great in salads, sliced thin on sandwiches, sauteed in dishes like stir fries, and and baked in with scalloped potatoes.

Otherwise, the greens are bountiful and we’ve got lots to choose from — spinach, chard, kale, beet greens. And the carrots continue to flow.

The market is open. Hope you find something you like!

Farmer Sara

Gwinnett Locally Grown:  Cod Liver Oil Order


I am going to be placing an order with Green Pastures. Please place orders through the market if interested.

I will leave market open for a few more hours in case you would like to place an order for Cod Liver Oil, or anything else. Don’t forget to order extra raw milk from Johnston here as well.

Have a great week!

Pilar

Clemson SC:  Last Chance to Order Local Groceries for This Week


Good Morning!
Tomorrow, Tuesday, is our drop-off in Clemson for this week.
If you would like to get your Happy Cow Creamery products, Bar-T Ranch-Taylor Farm Beef, Putney Farm Eggs, Split Creek Farm Products, Spurgeon Farm veggies and Dodie Spurgeon’s home cooked pies and soup, take a moment to go to the Market Page and make your selections.
We are gearing up for a fantastic spring filed with all sorts of veggies at Putney Farm. Already have some in the ground, and more sprouting, getting ready for the “official” time to plant here in the Upstate.
Do you have any requests? Something you’d like to see offered or in your Occaisional CSA this year?
Let us know and we will gladly plant some just for you.

BEST TIME TO ADD COMPOST TO YOUR SOIL
Remember, if you are starting your own garden, (and we encourage you to do that if you can) Stock up on compost from Putney Farm. This is a fine mix of leaves, straw and litter that the chickens scratch around in. These lovely ladies turn tons of leaves into fine humus, packed with live enzymes and great nutrients for amending your soil and boosting its fertility.
This compost is full of active cultures and will add to the vitality of your soil. You can either top-dress and scratch it in, mix it into your soil, or make a solution to spray the leaves. This spraying of the leaves with compost is known to protect your plants as well.
Putney’s Deep Litter Compost has been aged as well as composted, and is ready to apply full strength without burning your plants. We suggest you get your soil tested at a Clemson extension office, of course….to see where your soil stands now, then ad the compost, but you can also just dust it around your plants or incorporate an inch or two to build soil tilth, which is always a GOOD THING.
STARTER PLANT REQUESTS?
Speaking of growing your own; do you have any special requests for starter plants this year? Now is the time to put in your request and we will start some plants just for you! To request:Putneyfarm@aol.com
GREEN SMOOTHIE CHALLENGE:
Have you heard about Green Smoothies?Green smoothies are a super easy, low cost way to get a whole whack of vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, enzymes and more. And adding green smoothies to your diet will be the mildest way to get the toxins moving out of your system.

Basically, you just blend some greens with a liquid, add some fruit to make it delicious add ice, and blend, blend, blend.

My favorite fruits are banannas and apples, then I always add frozen berries, and a mild greeen like spinach, chard, or beet tops. a touch of parsely is a good cleanser, but just a TOUCH. Blend, blend, blend, and soon you have a smoothie that tastes delicious, builds health, and costs WAY LESS than any you buy at a store. Besides, you can control what goes into a home made smoothie, and I like to be in control of what goes into my body, don’t you?
So, order some mild greens, and lets get blending!
I challenge you to do a green smoothie a day for one week, and let’s see how much better you feel. Let us know how it changes you (You will be amazed)
Here are some links for recipes and pointers:Oh, My Raw will give you pointers on the detoxifying sied of Green Smoothies, like: “If you’d like to take the path of least resistance (nothing wrong with that) than simply start slower.
Start with one cup a day, then move up to a 1.5 cups in a several days, slowly increasing over a few weeks until you can have 3-4 cups or more a day (I have two full mason jars a day). As well, you can take it easy on the green portion of the smoothie to start. Start with 30% greens to 70% fruit and you should experience even fewer side effects.”
Recipe for Green Monster
Who’s in with me on this? Who is up to the challenge, and who is ready to feel a surge of bouyant good feelings?
See you tomorrow!
Donna

Northeast GA Locally Grown:  Locally Grown - Availability for January 30th, 2013


Hey Local Food Lovers,

Well this being the last week of January in this new year, it’s a great time to give a quick history of the Locally Grown Market. I know lots of you have been with us from the start, but for those who haven’t, there’s probably a detail or two about how Locally Grown works that you might not have known about.

Back in early 2010 several farms in Rabun County started talking about creating their own version of the Athens Locally Grown market here in the mountains. Eric Wagoner, a grower and software engineer in Athens began developing the Athens Locally Grown site in 2004 and immediately focused on creating a computer interface that would not only easily allow farmers to sell to customers online, but the system would be universally available to anyone else who wanted to start their very own internet farmers market.

I was living in Athens in 2005 and began shopping at the Athens Locally Grown market very slowly, and then after a 2006 bicycle ride to 50 farms across the country, I was hooked on local and began going every week. Meanwhile shortly after that Chuck Mashburn with Mill Gap Farm and Sylvan Mills Farm began listing their products through Athens Locally Grown and driving their products down all the way from Rabun County to Athens. They liked how the market worked and were learning its structure from the farmers perspective.

When I moved from Athens back to Clarkesville in 2009 I started looking for local food everywhere. Like I said, I’d developed a habit I just couldn’t live without. Aside from the Simply Homegrown market, and the So called Farmers Market in Satuee, local food was somewhat hard to come across, especially during the slow season, and as I met growers and customers I would frequently mention how the Athens Locally Grown market worked and why I thought it had some benefits.

Chuck was talking it up too, and he knew that his farm and many others had products they weren’t able to sell at weekend markets alone, and recognized that a midweek market would be popular with growers and customers. But it needed to be able to expand across a broader region than just Rabun County. For one there weren’t that many farms or customers in Rabun County alone.

Clarkesville at the time had no farmers market, but we did have a handful of farms in the area, and several more in neighboring White County. Chuck came up with the idea of kicking off a Locally Grown with two pickup locations (a feature that he knew was built into the Locally Grown software). That’s when he coaxed me to be the market manager for a Clarkesville site, and he would manage the Clayton site (this was before it was moved down the road to his farm in Tiger).

With the two of us on board, all we needed now was a bunch of growers willing to learn about how it worked and sign up. We had a meeting at Chuck’s house on March 15, 2010. At the meeting was David and Katrina Lent (and Daniel and Ariana) from Coleman River Farms, Brooks Franklin (who wasn’t even a farmer yet), Mike and Linda from Sylvan Falls Mill, Joe Gatins from La Gracia Farms, Chuck and Amy from Mill Gap Farm, Steve Whiteman from Trillium Farms, and Skip Komisar from Artisan Additions. Shortly afterward we started to create the site and had farmers sign up. I can remember spending an hour or so with a few of the first farms showing them how to go through all the steps of uploading photos, describing items, pricing, and then once the orders are in how to print out labels and where to bring the food. I had to go through it all too in order to explain it.

In the beginning Chuck and I were doing this on such an experimental basis that we just opened up a new checking account in his name to manage it. In pretty short order we realized the best way to manage the market was similar to how many if not most other farmers markets in the country are organized, as a non-profit. Since the organization I work for, the Soque River Watershed Association has as one of its primary missions to promote sustainable land based businesses, our board of directors agreed that the market was a good project towards that goal (and fit well with our community garden that was also started in 2010).

On April 24, 2010 we were up and running and if I recall correctly we sold over $300 that very first week. The first Clarkesville Location was at Polly Parker’s the Market Cafe (which is now Sweetbreads). Each week I’d drag all the coolers off the porch at the SRWA which was right around the corner and set them up on the side porch and eagerly await as the farmers brought in their orders.

I remember that very first week Belflower Gardens had signed up and made sales and I’d never even met Buddy and Suzanne before. They’ve now become close friends and collaborators. Ronnie from Mountain Earth Farms also was there from the beginning. I have an interesting aside about Ronnie. He called me right after reading about our organic community garden in the paper and offered to help us till the garden with his tractor and subsoiler. That’s a pretty good representation of how excited a lot of us were to be meeting for the first time. Many growers across Northeast Georgia had not met one another until now. Linda Lovell with Moonshadow Farms also made sales of starter tomato plants that very first week.

Well, from there things just started rolling. By the 3rd week we had 68 people signed up. Teri Parker made her first purchase on May 19th. She offered to volunteer and has been with us ever since as our most dedicated volunteer who we couldn’t live without at the Clarkesville Market location.

It’s a lot of fun to reminisce on our humble beginnings. Hope you’ve enjoyed it too. Next week I’ll get a little more into the details on how we manage the market, and how the financial part works.

Until then, of course you should………

EAT WELL,

Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun

Northeast GA Locally Grown:  Locally Grown - Availability for January 30th, 2013


Hey Local Food Lovers,

Well this being the last week of January in this new year, it’s a great time to give a quick history of the Locally Grown Market. I know lots of you have been with us from the start, but for those who haven’t, there’s probably a detail or two about how Locally Grown works that you might not have known about.

Back in early 2010 several farms in Rabun County started talking about creating their own version of the Athens Locally Grown market here in the mountains. Eric Wagoner, a grower and software engineer in Athens began developing the Athens Locally Grown site in 2004 and immediately focused on creating a computer interface that would not only easily allow farmers to sell to customers online, but the system would be universally available to anyone else who wanted to start their very own internet farmers market.

I was living in Athens in 2005 and began shopping at the Athens Locally Grown market very slowly, and then after a 2006 bicycle ride to 50 farms across the country, I was hooked on local and began going every week. Meanwhile shortly after that Chuck Mashburn with Mill Gap Farm and Sylvan Mills Farm began listing their products through Athens Locally Grown and driving their products down all the way from Rabun County to Athens. They liked how the market worked and were learning its structure from the farmers perspective.

When I moved from Athens back to Clarkesville in 2009 I started looking for local food everywhere. Like I said, I’d developed a habit I just couldn’t live without. Aside from the Simply Homegrown market, and the So called Farmers Market in Satuee, local food was somewhat hard to come across, especially during the slow season, and as I met growers and customers I would frequently mention how the Athens Locally Grown market worked and why I thought it had some benefits.

Chuck was talking it up too, and he knew that his farm and many others had products they weren’t able to sell at weekend markets alone, and recognized that a midweek market would be popular with growers and customers. But it needed to be able to expand across a broader region than just Rabun County. For one there weren’t that many farms or customers in Rabun County alone.

Clarkesville at the time had no farmers market, but we did have a handful of farms in the area, and several more in neighboring White County. Chuck came up with the idea of kicking off a Locally Grown with two pickup locations (a feature that he knew was built into the Locally Grown software). That’s when he coaxed me to be the market manager for a Clarkesville site, and he would manage the Clayton site (this was before it was moved down the road to his farm in Tiger).

With the two of us on board, all we needed now was a bunch of growers willing to learn about how it worked and sign up. We had a meeting at Chuck’s house on March 15, 2010. At the meeting was David and Katrina Lent (and Daniel and Ariana) from Coleman River Farms, Brooks Franklin (who wasn’t even a farmer yet), Mike and Linda from Sylvan Falls Mill, Joe Gatins from La Gracia Farms, Chuck and Amy from Mill Gap Farm, Steve Whiteman from Trillium Farms, and Skip Komisar from Artisan Additions. Shortly afterward we started to create the site and had farmers sign up. I can remember spending an hour or so with a few of the first farms showing them how to go through all the steps of uploading photos, describing items, pricing, and then once the orders are in how to print out labels and where to bring the food. I had to go through it all too in order to explain it.

In the beginning Chuck and I were doing this on such an experimental basis that we just opened up a new checking account in his name to manage it. In pretty short order we realized the best way to manage the market was similar to how many if not most other farmers markets in the country are organized, as a non-profit. Since the organization I work for, the Soque River Watershed Association has as one of its primary missions to promote sustainable land based businesses, our board of directors agreed that the market was a good project towards that goal (and fit well with our community garden that was also started in 2010).

On April 24, 2010 we were up and running and if I recall correctly we sold over $300 that very first week. The first Clarkesville Location was at Polly Parker’s the Market Cafe (which is now Sweetbreads). Each week I’d drag all the coolers off the porch at the SRWA which was right around the corner and set them up on the side porch and eagerly await as the farmers brought in their orders.

I remember that very first week Belflower Gardens had signed up and made sales and I’d never even met Buddy and Suzanne before. They’ve now become close friends and collaborators. Ronnie from Mountain Earth Farms also was there from the beginning. I have an interesting aside about Ronnie. He called me right after reading about our organic community garden in the paper and offered to help us till the garden with his tractor and subsoiler. That’s a pretty good representation of how excited a lot of us were to be meeting for the first time. Many growers across Northeast Georgia had not met one another until now. Linda Lovell with Moonshadow Farms also made sales of starter tomato plants that very first week.

Well, from there things just started rolling. By the 3rd week we had 68 people signed up. Teri Parker made her first purchase on May 19th. She offered to volunteer and has been with us ever since as our most dedicated volunteer who we couldn’t live without at the Clarkesville Market location.

It’s a lot of fun to reminisce on our humble beginnings. Hope you’ve enjoyed it too. Next week I’ll get a little more into the details on how we manage the market, and how the financial part works.

Until then, of course you should………

EAT WELL,

Justin in Habersham
and
Chuck in Rabun

Athens Locally Grown:  Availability for January 31


I’m somewhere in far West Georgia as I type this, returning from a week in Little Rock, Arkansas, for the annual conference for the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group. I was joined by about 1200 other like-minded individuals, swapping information, stories, and inspiration. I got to meet a number of other Locally Grown market managers, many for the very first time face-to-face. There are 18 markets in Arkansas alone using the system we built together here in Athens, and hundreds more across the country. I absolutely love how the food system in Athens has grown over the last fifteen years, and it warms my heart meeting people from other communities who have looked upon what we have accomplished here and are working on doing the same there.

I haven’t had a chance yet to look through the availability for this week, but I see there are nearly 1000 items listed. We might have short days and cold nights, but the food is still growing, thanks to the hard work of all of our farmers.

Thanks for all of your support of Athens Locally Grown, our farmers, and your community. Know that many other people from literally around the world are watching what we’ve done here, and are envious. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!