The Weblog

This weblog contains LocallyGrown.net news and the weblog entries from all the markets currently using the system.

To visit the authoring market’s website, click on the market name located in the entry’s title.



 
Subscribe to an RSS Feed

Upstate Locally Grown Greenville:  Harvest News and Market is Open


-




Upstate Locally Grown Market
http://www.upstatesc.locallygrown.net http://clemson.locallygrown.net/

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

HARVEST NEWS EDITOR/ CLEMSON MARKET MANAGER
Heidi Williams

Recipes


SOME NATURAL SOLUTIONS TO COMMON HOUSEHOLD PESTS:
DE:
Fleas, roaches, silverfish, ants etc #1
sprinkle food grade diatomaceous earth (DE) on carpets furniture, pet bedding, baseboard, behind furniture etc. leave as long as possible ( this can be left behind furniture etc, hours, days weeks months) vacuum up any in areas where you walk or sit after fleas are gone. Safe for kids & animals. so safe we feed it to our animals & we take it daily.
BORAX:
Fleas, roaches, silverfish, ants etc #2
Sprinkle Borax on carpets furniture, baseboards, behind furniture etc. leave as long as possible & Vacuum up
VINEGAR
Pet accidents
Straight warmed vinegar, cover with folded towel & let sit
Or use a mixture of white vinegar, peroxide & eucalyptus oil, cover with folded towel & let sit.
BAKING SODA:
Or make a paste of baking soda, peroxide with eucalyptus essential oil, cover with folded towel & let sit then vacuum up once dry.
MINT:
To repel spiders
Spray bottle with 10 drops of liquid soap & 10 to 20 drops peppermint essential oil, spray spiders & spray areas where the hang out.
_____________________

I am NOT a doctor. This page is for education only, and is NOT intended to be medical advice. Always talk with your health practitioner before taking any herbs or supplements.
Natural and Frugal

Natural Cleaning Solutions from National Geographic Green Living
The most economical way to give your home an eco-friendly cleaning is with natural do-it-yourself cleaning solutions you make with gentle, everyday household products. Chemical-laden cleaners create toxic fumes and may promote growth of bacteria resistant to antibacterial drugs(see References 1). Look no further than under the sink or in the pantry for these multitasking, economical, nontoxic ingredients that work alone or in combination to effectively give dirt the boot from every room.

Vinegar
The slightly acidic nature of white vinegar makes it effective at dissolving grease, soap scum and lime deposits from smooth surfaces in the kitchen and bathroom. Because it’s so gentle, vinegar is also safe to use on hardwood floors. Mix 1/4 to 1/2 cup of vinegar with water in a bucket or spray bottle and use it to clean everything from windows and mirrors to toilets and floors. Use undiluted vinegar to tackle tougher cleaning jobs. (See References 3)

Baking Soda
Baking soda not only deodorizes, but also acts as a green cleaning and brightening abrasive that rivals traditional powdered cleansers. Sprinkle hard surfaces in the bathroom and kitchen with baking soda and rub into a paste with a wet cloth, then rinse and wipe dry with a clean cloth. To remove stains or clean the inside of a messy oven, allow the paste to set for several minutes before rinsing; to boost the abrasive action for tougher cleaning jobs, add kosher salt to the paste. Sprinkle baking soda onto carpets and vacuum to freshen fibers. (See References 2)

Lemon Juice
Lemon juice cuts grease, kills mold and mildew and leaves a streak-free shine on hard surfaces of all kinds. Combine lemon juice with other pantry staples such as vinegar or olive oil to make cleaning products that work harder, and to leave a fresh, natural scent behind when the job is done. (See References 6 )

Sodium Borate
Available in the laundry detergent aisle, sodium borate, or borax, has a long history as a nontoxic powdered laundry booster, but it’s also effective in homemade cleaning products to disinfect kitchen and bathroom surfaces, cookware and floors (see References 4). Remove stains from laundry before washing by rubbing a paste of dishwasher detergent and sodium borate into the fabric and rinsing (see References 1).

Hydrogen Peroxide
The bubbling action of hydrogen peroxide does wonders in lifting stubborn gunk on surfaces, but also works to fizz away perspiration stains on white fabrics. Keep a spray bottle filled with a peroxide and water mixture near the washing machine; spritz spots and rinse with clean water before starting a load. If you don’t have hydrogen peroxide in the house, or need to safely remove stains from colored fabrics, try club soda or diluted vinegar instead. (See References 5)

Olive Oil
Blend 1 cup of olive oil and 1/2 cup of lemon juice in a spray bottle, mist onto a soft cloth and polish wood furniture the natural way. Polishing with olive oil moisturizes wood and imparts a lovely shine; lemon juice cleans the surface and leaves behind a fresh scent that beats out aerosol wood dusting sprays in the green department.

Market News

WELCOME USLG MEMBERS

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 4-5:15PM at Clemson Montessori School. Tuesday 4-6 pm AT Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery or Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market Greenvile. SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILS OR TEXT 864-353-6096

*ANNOUNCEMENT! DOING BOOKS:
DEPOSITS: PLEASE KEEP YOUR ACCOUNTS AT ZERO; NOT MORE, NOT LESS, AS WE ARE BALANCING OUR BOOKS. If you owe us, please reconcile, or if we owe you, please speak up. putneyfarm@aol.com
*LOOKING FOR HELPERS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN LEARNING ADMINISTRATIVE SKILLS FOR RUNNING A COMMUNITY BASED ONLINE FARMER’S MARKET. MUCH TO GAIN FROM THIS EXPERIENCE, and a great interning opportunity. Contact Donna 864-353-8096
Would you like a “say” in how the Upstate Locally Grown family should grow? Do you have suggestions, comments, questions? We always welcome comments, but if you would like to be on an online discussion which will influence the way we go, please copy Donna for your seat on the forum. (putneyfarm@aol.com) (See below for related information)

Changing with the times:As the very first market of our kind in South Carolina,Upstate Locally Grown online Farmer’s Market and its sister Markets, Clemson and Greenwood Locally Grown have been the leaders, the precedent setters, and the, uh, well, guinea pig for the markets which followed. The Upstate has gone through many changes and transitions in the nearly seven years of our existence, and all the Upstate has become so much “greener”. Many, Many different marketing opportunities have opened up for the 40 plus sustainable growers who have graced our website along the way. So, as times change, and needs change, We at USLG are ready to proceed into another phase. We need your help in order to do this. Upstate Locally Grown has always operated as a not-for profit, even though we haven’t applied for this status. What this means is that all of our efforts went toward promoting Upstate growers, and all proceeds went toward that goal. No-one has ever gotten a salary; thousands of donated hours were accrued towards getting you the freshest, purest, most healthy foods available anywhere. Many have told us that we did succeed in our goals of making the Upstate aware of the need to support the local foods movement in order to keep small farms and businesses growing.
Now we are moving up to applying for non-profit status. USLG would be, as always, dedicated to promoting local, sustainable foods, growers, and food systems, plus local small businesses. We plan to expand our horizons and become more education-oriented. If any of you have had experience in the field of non-profits, and would like to offer a little help, we are open to a helping hand in this.
We are also seeking interns and volunteers who would benefit from the experience of entering into a new era of local food systems.
Specifically, we are looking for people to contribute articles, distribute food, meet growers and interview them, and help with the web site and social media. We are willing to train you, and there will be some benefits. Please contact Donna at 864-353-6096.

We thank you for registering at Upstate Locally Grown and “Clemson Locally Grown:”Clemson.locallygrown.net.
Please encourage your friends and co-workers to join us in the effort to make farm-to table food a regular part of our lives.

Upstate Locally Grown donates 3 percent of our order sales right off the top to Broken Wing Farm, a project to teach autistic boys the art of growing food.
Clemson Locally Grown Donates 3%of your sales to Clemson Montessori School.

FREE MONTH OF MEMBERSHIP!*
Did you know, anyone who has a recipe or article published in the Harvest News is entitled to one added month of membership! Tell us about your garden, share your favorite eats with us, or even a book review. Please email your CLG content to Heidi.

Donna’s Corner



Heidi C Williams, Clemson Market Coordinator

We really appreciate all of you, as Upstate Locally Grown cannot work without a cooperative effort of all concerned. And thanks to Heidi C Williams, CLG coordinator, my encourager, who keeps me focused on the good that we are doing and why it is all worth it, even when things go haywire, as things tend to do sometimes.
Here is a cause that is near and dear to my heart, and I am sure that it is of concern to many of you.
Did you know that 90% of our heirloom seeds are now gone? Why dies that matter? It is very important that these seeds, which were passed from generation-to-generation are preserved. You see, these seeds are from plants that have passed the test of time and endured; endured droughts, floods, pest invasions, and other natural disasters. These are seeds from plants that taste delicious, look great, grow well, and are sturdy. If we let these go by the wayside, we will be letting go of reliable seed stock and substituting weak and unnaturally structured plants. The Genetically modified seeds CANNOT reproduce.
What are GMO’s, you say? ‘From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia":http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_organism
"A genetically modified organism (GMO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. Organisms that have been genetically modified include micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeast, insects, plants, fish, and mammals. GMOs are the source of genetically modified foods, and are also widely used in scientific research and to produce goods other than food. The term GMO is very close to the technical legal term, ’living modified organism’ defined in the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, which regulates international trade in living GMOs (specifically, “any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology”).

This article focuses on what organisms have been genetically engineered, and for what purposes." ~http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_organism
“here”: is a link to a video where a darling child explains what GMS’s are so that even a child can understand. (Cute too!)
Why worry? GMO’s have been proven to adversely affect our health.
If you have time please: Watch the full-length documentary The World According to Monsanto
here is news about a new study showing how GMO’s negatively affect mouse blood.
“here” is a link to an article talking about CRIIGEN Study Links GM Maize and Roundup to Premature Death and Cancer Study Links GM Maize and Roundup to Premature Death and Cancer.
In this day and age of GMO vs. NON-GMO food, Going to the supermarket is a pretty confusing task to most. Use this category and colored coded shopping guide by Greenpeace to help make things a little easier.:
How To Avoid GMO Foods – Organic Shopping Guide Category & Color Coded Greenpeace GMO shopping Guide

here is where you can download a non-GMO shopping guide to take with you to the grocery store.

SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD
March Against Monsanto, a world-wide event happening on May 25
March Against Monsanto, Greenville
https://www.facebook.com/MarchAgainstMonsantoGreenvilleSC

Countdown:
21 days
517 hours
31066 minutes
1863981 seconds
from the time this article was written. Here is the link to the countdown timer.


The Whole Reason

Jess O’Neal Bayne and husband are organizing the Greenville, SC portion of this upcoming world-wide event. The main event is happening May 25 in Greenville and _all around the world . It is called March Against Monsanto. This is a march and rally in response to the “Monsanto Protection Act,” recently signed by President Obama as a part of HR 933.
You can organize a rally un your town. View some of the world’s cities already participating.
If you are like me, and care about what you put into your body,(and I know you care) I encourage you to lend your support to this event.
“Be a Part Of The Change You Want to See”
Read Jess’s story about how caring what went into her children’s bodies got both Jess and her husband Aaron Bayne involved here
For more information, visit the Facebook site here.
the world-wide mission statement can be found here
Watch the full length documentary “The World According to Monsanto” here
DbVdVo-k

Donna and Lenard, Heidi, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

Jbo Locally Grown:  Opening day!


The Saturday Market is back!

Tomorrow’s music will be by: “The Symphony Rags” with Brandon Story, starting at 9.

This season we welcome back 35 vendors who have sold with us before, and we hope you’ll help us welcome these new vendors who will be joining us:

  • Claudia Randolph, produce, eggs and honey
  • John & Pat Lynch, Farmhouse Gallery baked goods and coffee
  • Carol Rouse, Carol’s Cakes
  • Ginny Wall, watercolors and “All Nature Sings” natural bath productt. Ginny will be at the market two times per month.
  • Angie Sheek, Sheek’s Treats (baked treats for dogs) Angie will be at the market about once per month.

Also New this year: the Old Courthouse Diner plans to be open for breakfast!

The weekly prize drawing is back! Each week you may enter your name for for a chance to win our $25 gift certificate drawing the following week! This is our "frequent shopper reward…if you’re at the market each week, be sure to enter!

Remember: Debit, credit and EBT cards can be used at the market. EBT customers may get up to a $10 bonus when using thier cards. See the info booth for details.

Did you want a market Tshirt and we ran out of your size? Place your order at the market info booth by May 11—Cost is $15.

And now, proudly introducing…Know your farmer! This is a weekly series that will be featured in local papers and shared here as well. The unique thing about our market is that you can only sell it if you grow it…so you can really know your farmer and learn about how your food is raised. We hope you will get to know your farmers as you shop, and learn even more through these interviews. First up: Chris Wilson aka “the lamb lady”


   

Read Chris’s story here. And enjoy an easy, award winning recipe here for Southern Lamb and Grits.

And please come see Chris…and all our other fine vendors tomorrow morning!
8am-noon
Courthouse Square

Clemson SC:  Market is Open for 5/7 Drop-off


-




Upstate Locally Grown Market CLEMSON
http://clemson.locallygrown.net/

To Contact Us

CLICK HERE TO UNSUBSCRIBE OR CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT STATUS
TO CONTACT US
Market Administrator
Donna Putney

HARVEST NEWS EDITOR/ CLEMSON MARKET MANAGER
Heidi Williams

Recipes


SOME NATURAL SOLUTIONS TO COMMON HOUSEHOLD PESTS:
DE:
Fleas, roaches, silverfish, ants etc #1
sprinkle food grade diatomaceous earth (DE) on carpets furniture, pet bedding, baseboard, behind furniture etc. leave as long as possible ( this can be left behind furniture etc, hours, days weeks months) vacuum up any in areas where you walk or sit after fleas are gone. Safe for kids & animals. so safe we feed it to our animals & we take it daily.
BORAX:
Fleas, roaches, silverfish, ants etc #2
Sprinkle Borax on carpets furniture, baseboards, behind furniture etc. leave as long as possible & Vacuum up
VINEGAR
Pet accidents
Straight warmed vinegar, cover with folded towel & let sit
Or use a mixture of white vinegar, peroxide & eucalyptus oil, cover with folded towel & let sit.
BAKING SODA:
Or make a paste of baking soda, peroxide with eucalyptus essential oil, cover with folded towel & let sit then vacuum up once dry.
MINT:
To repel spiders
Spray bottle with 10 drops of liquid soap & 10 to 20 drops peppermint essential oil, spray spiders & spray areas where the hang out.
_____________________

I am NOT a doctor. This page is for education only, and is NOT intended to be medical advice. Always talk with your health practitioner before taking any herbs or supplements.
Natural and Frugal

Natural Cleaning Solutions from National Geographic Green Living
The most economical way to give your home an eco-friendly cleaning is with natural do-it-yourself cleaning solutions you make with gentle, everyday household products. Chemical-laden cleaners create toxic fumes and may promote growth of bacteria resistant to antibacterial drugs(see References 1). Look no further than under the sink or in the pantry for these multitasking, economical, nontoxic ingredients that work alone or in combination to effectively give dirt the boot from every room.

Vinegar
The slightly acidic nature of white vinegar makes it effective at dissolving grease, soap scum and lime deposits from smooth surfaces in the kitchen and bathroom. Because it’s so gentle, vinegar is also safe to use on hardwood floors. Mix 1/4 to 1/2 cup of vinegar with water in a bucket or spray bottle and use it to clean everything from windows and mirrors to toilets and floors. Use undiluted vinegar to tackle tougher cleaning jobs. (See References 3)

Baking Soda
Baking soda not only deodorizes, but also acts as a green cleaning and brightening abrasive that rivals traditional powdered cleansers. Sprinkle hard surfaces in the bathroom and kitchen with baking soda and rub into a paste with a wet cloth, then rinse and wipe dry with a clean cloth. To remove stains or clean the inside of a messy oven, allow the paste to set for several minutes before rinsing; to boost the abrasive action for tougher cleaning jobs, add kosher salt to the paste. Sprinkle baking soda onto carpets and vacuum to freshen fibers. (See References 2)

Lemon Juice
Lemon juice cuts grease, kills mold and mildew and leaves a streak-free shine on hard surfaces of all kinds. Combine lemon juice with other pantry staples such as vinegar or olive oil to make cleaning products that work harder, and to leave a fresh, natural scent behind when the job is done. (See References 6 )

Sodium Borate
Available in the laundry detergent aisle, sodium borate, or borax, has a long history as a nontoxic powdered laundry booster, but it’s also effective in homemade cleaning products to disinfect kitchen and bathroom surfaces, cookware and floors (see References 4). Remove stains from laundry before washing by rubbing a paste of dishwasher detergent and sodium borate into the fabric and rinsing (see References 1).

Hydrogen Peroxide
The bubbling action of hydrogen peroxide does wonders in lifting stubborn gunk on surfaces, but also works to fizz away perspiration stains on white fabrics. Keep a spray bottle filled with a peroxide and water mixture near the washing machine; spritz spots and rinse with clean water before starting a load. If you don’t have hydrogen peroxide in the house, or need to safely remove stains from colored fabrics, try club soda or diluted vinegar instead. (See References 5)

Olive Oil
Blend 1 cup of olive oil and 1/2 cup of lemon juice in a spray bottle, mist onto a soft cloth and polish wood furniture the natural way. Polishing with olive oil moisturizes wood and imparts a lovely shine; lemon juice cleans the surface and leaves behind a fresh scent that beats out aerosol wood dusting sprays in the green department.

Market News

WELCOME CLG CUSTOMERS
WELCOME USLG MEMBERS

THE MARKET IS OPEN FOR ORDERING!

Order today for pickup Tuesday from 4-5:15PM at Clemson Montessori School. Tuesday 4-6 pm AT Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery or Wed 8-8 at Whole Foods Market Greenvile. SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILS OR TEXT 864-353-6096

*ANNOUNCEMENT! DOING BOOKS:
DEPOSITS: PLEASE KEEP YOUR ACCOUNTS AT ZERO; NOT MORE, NOT LESS, AS WE ARE BALANCING OUR BOOKS. If you owe us, please reconcile, or if we owe you, please speak up. putneyfarm@aol.com
*LOOKING FOR HELPERS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN LEARNING ADMINISTRATIVE SKILLS FOR RUNNING A COMMUNITY BASED ONLINE FARMER’S MARKET. MUCH TO GAIN FROM THIS EXPERIENCE, and a great interning opportunity. Contact Donna 864-353-8096
Would you like a “say” in how the Upstate Locally Grown family should grow? Do you have suggestions, comments, questions? We always welcome comments, but if you would like to be on an online discussion which will influence the way we go, please copy Donna for your seat on the forum. (putneyfarm@aol.com) (See below for related information)

Changing with the times:As the very first market of our kind in South Carolina,Upstate Locally Grown online Farmer’s Market and its sister Markets, Clemson and Greenwood Locally Grown have been the leaders, the precedent setters, and the, uh, well, guinea pig for the markets which followed. The Upstate has gone through many changes and transitions in the nearly seven years of our existence, and all the Upstate has become so much “greener”. Many, Many different marketing opportunities have opened up for the 40 plus sustainable growers who have graced our website along the way. So, as times change, and needs change, We at USLG are ready to proceed into another phase. We need your help in order to do this. Upstate Locally Grown has always operated as a not-for profit, even though we haven’t applied for this status. What this means is that all of our efforts went toward promoting Upstate growers, and all proceeds went toward that goal. No-one has ever gotten a salary; thousands of donated hours were accrued towards getting you the freshest, purest, most healthy foods available anywhere. Many have told us that we did succeed in our goals of making the Upstate aware of the need to support the local foods movement in order to keep small farms and businesses growing.
Now we are moving up to applying for non-profit status. USLG would be, as always, dedicated to promoting local, sustainable foods, growers, and food systems, plus local small businesses. We plan to expand our horizons and become more education-oriented. If any of you have had experience in the field of non-profits, and would like to offer a little help, we are open to a helping hand in this.
We are also seeking interns and volunteers who would benefit from the experience of entering into a new era of local food systems.
Specifically, we are looking for people to contribute articles, distribute food, meet growers and interview them, and help with the web site and social media. We are willing to train you, and there will be some benefits. Please contact Donna at 864-353-6096.

We thank you for registering at Upstate Locally Grown and “Clemson Locally Grown:”Clemson.locallygrown.net.
Please encourage your friends and co-workers to join us in the effort to make farm-to table food a regular part of our lives.

Upstate Locally Grown donates 3 percent of our order sales right off the top to Broken Wing Farm, a project to teach autistic boys the art of growing food.
Clemson Locally Grown Donates 3%of your sales to Clemson Montessori School.

FREE MONTH OF MEMBERSHIP!*
Did you know, anyone who has a recipe or article published in the Harvest News is entitled to one added month of membership! Tell us about your garden, share your favorite eats with us, or even a book review. Please email your CLG content to Heidi.

Donna’s Corner



Heidi C Williams, Clemson Market Coordinator

We really appreciate all of you, as Upstate Locally Grown cannot work without a cooperative effort of all concerned. And thanks to Heidi C Williams, CLG coordinator, my encourager, who keeps me focused on the good that we are doing and why it is all worth it, even when things go haywire, as things tend to do sometimes.
Here is a cause that is near and dear to my heart, and I am sure that it is of concern to many of you.
Did you know that 90% of our heirloom seeds are now gone? Why dies that matter? It is very important that these seeds, which were passed from generation-to-generation are preserved. You see, these seeds are from plants that have passed the test of time and endured; endured droughts, floods, pest invasions, and other natural disasters. These are seeds from plants that taste delicious, look great, grow well, and are sturdy. If we let these go by the wayside, we will be letting go of reliable seed stock and substituting weak and unnaturally structured plants. The Genetically modified seeds CANNOT reproduce.
What are GMO’s, you say? ‘From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia":http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_organism
"A genetically modified organism (GMO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. Organisms that have been genetically modified include micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeast, insects, plants, fish, and mammals. GMOs are the source of genetically modified foods, and are also widely used in scientific research and to produce goods other than food. The term GMO is very close to the technical legal term, ’living modified organism’ defined in the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, which regulates international trade in living GMOs (specifically, “any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology”).

This article focuses on what organisms have been genetically engineered, and for what purposes." ~http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_organism
“here”: is a link to a video where a darling child explains what GMS’s are so that even a child can understand. (Cute too!)
Why worry? GMO’s have been proven to adversely affect our health.
If you have time please: Watch the full-length documentary The World According to Monsanto
here is news about a new study showing how GMO’s negatively affect mouse blood.
“here” is a link to an article talking about CRIIGEN Study Links GM Maize and Roundup to Premature Death and Cancer Study Links GM Maize and Roundup to Premature Death and Cancer.
In this day and age of GMO vs. NON-GMO food, Going to the supermarket is a pretty confusing task to most. Use this category and colored coded shopping guide by Greenpeace to help make things a little easier.:
How To Avoid GMO Foods – Organic Shopping Guide Category & Color Coded Greenpeace GMO shopping Guide

here is where you can download a non-GMO shopping guide to take with you to the grocery store.

SMALL ACTS, WHEN MULTIPLIED BY MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, CAN TRANSFORM THE WORLD
March Against Monsanto, a world-wide event happening on May 25
March Against Monsanto, Greenville
https://www.facebook.com/MarchAgainstMonsantoGreenvilleSC

Countdown:
21 days
517 hours
31066 minutes
1863981 seconds
from the time this article was written. Here is the link to the countdown timer.


The Whole Reason

Jess O’Neal Bayne and husband are organizing the Greenville, SC portion of this upcoming world-wide event. The main event is happening May 25 in Greenville and _all around the world . It is called March Against Monsanto. This is a march and rally in response to the “Monsanto Protection Act,” recently signed by President Obama as a part of HR 933.
You can organize a rally un your town. View some of the world’s cities already participating.
If you are like me, and care about what you put into your body,(and I know you care) I encourage you to lend your support to this event.
“Be a Part Of The Change You Want to See”
Read Jess’s story about how caring what went into her children’s bodies got both Jess and her husband Aaron Bayne involved here
For more information, visit the Facebook site here.
the world-wide mission statement can be found here
Watch the full length documentary “The World According to Monsanto” here
DbVdVo-k

Donna and Lenard, Heidi, and the whole gang of Market helpers.

McColloms Market:  May FFFN Order is Now Open


Hi Everyone:

The Order is now open until Monday at 5 pm. The pick up will be next Wed., May 8th from 4:30 pm to 6:45 pm at 103 Helen St., Saranac Lake. My cell phone is: 518-418-9236 if you need to reach me that day.

Here’s the link to the market: http://mccollomsmarketsl.locallygrown.net/
I’m also going to attach the product listing.

Cheers,

Melinda

Conway, AR:  CLG Pickup TODAY! 4-6pm. Need egg cartons, please.


Good Morning,

This is a pickup reminder for those of you who ordered this week. Thank you for your order. You can pick up your order from 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. today at Saint Peter’s Episcopal Church at 925 Mitchell Street in Conway.

*Remember to bring your glass jars for recycling, egg cartons, and bags for ordered items. *Reduce, reuse, recycle!

See you this afternoon. Have a great day!

Farm Where Life is Good:  Spring has sprung in Wisconsin...wait, nope!



Can it be May 1st?

Farm Where Life is Good

May Day

Sequence of events—-

Tuesday all day: I just have to say…California (or Arizona or Florida…) eat your heart out! This morning I walked in a T-shirt thru the snow to turn on the electric breaker for the well pump, then sloshed thru a muddy field to the high tunnel to water the seedlings inside. Only in the Midwest can you experience the diversity of a wild Spring season! 77degrees and full sun allowed for a pleasant maple bucket clean up.


Maple season cleanup in the warm sunshine (for once!)

Wednesday PM: Ok, I am back. Back from that euphoric spring-induced state we Midwesterners get into when we forget what winter did to us; I am firmly back, staring out the door at the blanket of snow and dense falling flakes. California HERE I COME!!!!!


Chives in May…they WANT to play

Thursday AM: Well, we didn’t get to California quickly enough. Staring wide-eyed into the darkness last night, we listened to the trees popping and falling all around us, saw the huge flair of our electric transformer blow from downed lines, and heard 16 nice big thumps all in a row (note: the high tunnel has 16 “ribs”). Steady…. The tunnel survived better than our nerves!


Farm in a blanket


Driveway going nowhere…

Thursday PM: Sanity was restored once some trees were chainsawed, the driveway/road access cleared, power restored (HOT WATER restored!) and a few hours were spent in the 70 degree high tunnel transplanting (with a little help from our friend) and installing low tunnels in preparation for the high tunnel move to Position #2 in a week!


Transplanting assistant—The Yellow-rumped Warbler

Spinach transplants for the Popeyes out there!

Tucking in progress…

Tunnel crops all tucked in for tunnel move next week .

Recipes for your Consideration

I had an inspiration the other day with left over rice. My mind when to “fried rice” but my palate said “nope” to the Asian variety. So I reverted to our stores of canned, frozen, root-cellared produce from last year and concocted a south-of-the-border variety. The “day-old” route allowed it to remain non-sticky!

Mexican Fried Rice

1 onion, diced
4 cups day-old cooked white/brown rice
1 pint homemade, canned salsa
1 bunch frozen rough-chopped cilantro, thawed and drained (or fresh)
1 tsp ground cumin
Optional: 1-2c protein of your choice (cubed tofu, “ripped” wheat meat)
½ lime squeeze

Sauté onion in skillet with 1Tbsp olive oil.
Add rice and stir to heat evenly.
Add salsa, cilantro and cumin (+/- protein); stir and fold to mix well and heat thru.
Squeeze lime over rice and serve.

Did You Know?

Meet the Yellow-rumped Warbler

Common and conspicuous; in many areas the only warbler likely to be seen in winter. (Did you hear that? Yes, the warbler was here and it is clearly winter today, May 2nd!!!)
Nests in relatively open coniferous forests and their edges. (No coniferouses here at FarmWLIG.)
Winters in open brushy habitats, such as dunes and field edges, especially among fruiting shrubs like bayberry and juniper. Often in small loose flocks. (This little fella, actually twins, or better yet, the plump one was probably the female full of eggs, who kept alternating as my assistant, were solitary but both really liked my boots for some reason; they were really quite pleasant companions.)
Often perches upright on relatively exposed perches, flying up to catch passing insects. (These guys/gals loved the flea beetles and earthworms…no MP, native worms not the composting red wigglers!)
A rather large, long tailed warbler, with stout dark bill. Bright yellow rump-patch distinctive and often conspicuous. (These twirps were tiny…but who are we to know what a large warbler would look like. We grow vegetables!)
Song is rather flat (well, that’s downright rude!) soft warble sidl sidl sidl sidl seedl seedl seedl seedl seel (are there any birders out there who “get” this written bird song language?) usually fading at end.
Call a low flat chep.
Flight call a clear ssit. (Well that’s quite clear, isn’t it?)
Yellow-rumped Warbler, take a bow! (From: The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Eastern North America)

Farm News


The Greenhouse bursting at its seams…violas flowering…caution— blizzard outside

The high tunnel is almost 100% planted; we had to call an audible and substitute in some diversity crops when it was obvious the outdoor fields will remain unusable for another (short?) while. Carrots made it in there, along with the salad mix, lettuce heads, boc choi, mustard greens, salad turnips, radishes, spinach. Prepping for leeks this weekend inside, maybe some kale too. These will be some of the early pickin’s.

The basement is in full swing with seed-starts for melon, summer squash, more spinach (!), chard, tomatillos, a steady succession of cabbages, various flowers and herbs to keep it interesting.

Roger is tallying and tabulating and making templates for box labels, etc., so if you are dragging your feet, jump on in and get your all-season subscription while the getting’ is good. There are a small handful left, just for you! (Ok, that’s the extent of my marketing genius.)

We are trying a small number of hanging flower baskets for sale and vegetable transplants for sale too. Keep an eye out; I’ll alert you when they are ready.

Have a wonderful week, and enjoy the anticipation of vegetables.

We hope to feed you soon!

Roger and Lara


Champaign, OH:  It's a great day!


Thank you so much to all our super customers who did a fantastic job tonight at the market! I want to send a huge shout out to Michelle Comer who is working hard to get everyone checked out! We couldn’t do it without you girl! By the way, did I mention how fantastic her pretzels are!!! Thanks to the vendors who are baking, planting, washing and prepping all the great items for us! Super job everyone! The market is now open and ready for sales! Keep watching as the produce is sneaking in! Have a great weekend everyone!

GFM :  Ordering now open for May 2nd - 5th


Ordering is now open for the first week of May. Stop on over and get your veggie plants. We have tomatoes of all kinds, broccoli, and all kinds of goodies. We also welcome A to Z Farms and their free ranged eggs, and tote bags made from recycled feed bags (coming soon). We hope everyone is out enjoying the wonderful weather we have been having.

Suwanee Whole Life Co-op:  News & Market is open


Market Special this week is From Mimi’s Mountain Home Bathroom Cleaning Kit ( Window Cleaner, Scouring Powder, and Bathroom Disinfectant) *All 3 products for only $11! * Look for it in the Weekly Specials section in the market.

Montage Farm will have goat milk listed but it will be frozen gallons.

Mountain Fresh Creamery has cream this week!

The market is now open for ordering!
suwanee.locallygrown.net

Have a great weekend!

Fisher's Produce:  Oklahoma City Update


I made a few minor changes to the product listing for our Oklahoma City delivery. I added bundled purple asparagus, and our new crop of pak choi does not have hail damage.

Luke